These 10 New Orleans restaurants opened since the new year, and you should know about them | Where NOLA Eats

Versie Dortch

A lot can happen in a few months, as we’ve all had dizzying, sometimes excruciating, sometimes uplifting opportunities to see living through the pandemic era.

In the realm of New Orleans restaurants, since the start of 2022 alone, we saw things all but grind to a halt from the omicron surge, the return to status quo, the arrival of Mardi Gras, the end of the last coronavirus safety mandates and finally a resurgent festival season.

We’ve also seen many new restaurants open. Some have long been in the works; others represent next-step evolution of their creators’ ambitions.

Altogether they have maintained what has long been a story of change, diversification and fresh talent pouring into the restaurant scene, one that not even the pandemic could pause for long.

Below is a bite-size taste of 10 that have debuted in the first four months of this year.







bisutoro 5.jpeg

Cured Arctic char is served with fried caper, lemon and dill at Bisutoro, a Japanese restaurant in New Orleans. (Staff photo by Ian McNulty, NOLA.com | The Times-Picayune)


Bisutoro on Magazine

1581 Magazine St., (504) 766-9009

The name means bistro, but this Lower Garden District restaurant is the picture of a sushi bar — small, intimate, focused. It’s the latest from Tanya Hailey, an owner of downtown’s rollicking Rock-n-Sake. Bisutoro is a much more elevated approach, with a wide-ranging variety of fish brought in from around the world, including many rarely seen on local sushi menus.







bisutoro 7.jpeg

The sushi bar is busy at Bisutoro, a small Japanese restaurant serving many chef specialties in New Orleans. (Staff photo by Ian McNulty, NOLA.com | The Times-Picayune)


You can put yourself in chef Ryan Smith’s hands for mixed sashimi platters or pick some of the signature rolls and cold composed dishes.







bisutoro 4.jpeg

The sea dream roll has sea bream, spicy tuna, tempura green onions and an oil of fine herbs at Bisutoro, a Japanese restaurant in New Orleans. (Staff photo by Ian McNulty, NOLA.com | The Times-Picayune)


The claret-colored cured arctic char has a flavor just as deep as it looks, finished with a bit of fried caper lemon and dill, and the sea dream roll layers sea bream, spicy tuna and tempura green onion, and adds a fine herbs oil. Try the Baja hamachi with pico de gallo for a great burst of acid along with the fiery flicker of thin-sliced jalapeño on the fish.







afrodisiac shrimp stew

Curry shrimp stew with fried catfish, corn and sweet potatoes at Afrodisiac, a restaurant for Creole and Caribbean fusion cuisine in Gentilly. (Staff photo by Ian McNulty, NOLA.com | The Times-Picayune)


Afrodisiac

5363 Franklin Ave., (504) 302-2090

What started as a food truck has grown into a full-service restaurant in Gentilly, and one that can play different roles in a neighborhood always eager for more options. Caron and Shaka Garel built a following by blending flavors from their respective Louisiana and Jamaican roots.







afrodisiac couple

Kay and Shaka Garel created Afrodisiac as a restaurant for Creole and Caribbean fusion cuisine in Gentilly. (Staff photo by Ian McNulty, NOLA.com | The Times-Picayune)


For instance, the shrimp stew mixes Creole flavor and island vibrancy beautifully, with lump shrimp mixing it up with smoked sausage and potatoes in the curry sauce. Jamaican fish has a bright, peppery escovitch sauce and the jerk chicken nachos make a fun bar snack.







afrodisiac drinks

A Gauva Rita (left) and Red Gyal Ring rum cocktail at Afrodisiac, a restaurant for Creole and Caribbean fusion cuisine in Gentilly. (Staff photo by Ian McNulty, NOLA.com | The Times-Picayune)


The cottage-sized restaurant has a dedicated bar with original cocktails, many following a tropical theme, and opens to a large, lush open-air patio for dining and events.







margots two pizzas

A supremo pizza (left) and shaved Brussels sprouts pizza at Margot’s, a restaurant for wood-fired pizza and cocktails in New Orleans. (Staff photo by Ian McNulty, NOLA.com | The Times-Picayune)


Margot’s

1243 Frenchmen St., (504) 224-2892

It’s well past the nightlife stretch of Frenchmen Street, but this small neighborhood pizzeria is a destination in its own right.







margots negroni

Negroni cocktails are a specialty at Margot’s, a restaurant for wood-fired pizza and cocktails in New Orleans. (Staff photo by Ian McNulty, NOLA.com | The Times-Picayune)


You’re coming for wood-fired, Neapolitan style pies, with leopard print patterns of char-marked bubbles around the edge. The sourdough crust that gives just the right pull when you bite in.

The bar is top-notch, with classic and contemporary cocktails, a particular fixation on negroni variations and a small batch wine selection that is constantly changing.







gloriette 14.jpeg

Flounder with crab and Grenobloise butter over brabant potatoes at the Gloriette, the restaurant at the Southern Hotel in Covington. (Staff photo by Ian McNulty, NOLA.com | The Times-Picayune)


The Gloriette

428 E. Boston St., Covington, (985) 202-8090

The Gloriette takes the place of Oxlot 9 in the Southern Hotel, a fixture in downtown Covington that can feel as much like a club for locals and lodgings for visitors. The executive chef is Steven Marsella, a veteran of the local culinary scene.







gloriette 10.jpeg

The dining room of the Gloriette, the restaurant at the Southern Hotel, has a theme of garden verdure worked into its design and windows framing nearby oaks. (Staff photo by Ian McNulty, NOLA.com | The Times-Picayune)


The menu is largely a mix of traditional French and Louisiana flavors, with dishes like the flounder with classic Grenobloise sauce (all butter, parsley, caper and lemon), a deep-dark and satisfying gumbo and the apple galette.







gloriette 14.jpeg

Flounder with crab and Grenobloise butter over brabant potatoes at the Gloriette, the restaurant at the Southern Hotel in Covington. (Staff photo by Ian McNulty, NOLA.com | The Times-Picayune)


For something quite different, try the pork and clams Alentejana, a traditional Portuguese dish that feels right at home in the land of Creole sauces.







rizzutos 3.jpeg

The spinalis, a lushly marbled steak with rich flavor and alternating textures, at Rizzuto’s Ristorante & Chop House. (Staff photo by Ian McNulty, NOLA.com | The Times-Picayune)


Rizzuto’s Ristorante & Chop House, Gretna

2020 Belle Chasse Highway, Gretna, (504)-766-8081

Last year, the Rizzuto family opened a pizzeria in Gretna and brought a few of the specialties from their more upscale Lakeview restaurant, Rizzuto’s Ristorante & Chop House. The pizzeria has now been converted to a second location of Rizzuto’s, serving the same mix of traditional Italian dishes and specialty steaks.







rizzutos 1.jpeg

The meatball is a menu centerpiece at Rizzuto’s Ristorante & Chop House, serving a mix of steaks and Italian dishes. (Staff photo by Ian McNulty, NOLA.com | The Times-Picayune)


The king of the menu is the spinalis, the rib-eye cap, a luxurious steak, a swirl of marbling and alternating textures across a deeply flavorful cut. But don’t miss the meatball either, plated up on its own (or with pasta) on a bed of ricotta.

Every Thursday we give you the scoop on NOLA dining. Sign up today.







rizzutos 4.jpeg

Rizzuto’s Ristorante & Chop House in Gretna serves a mix of steaks and Italian dishes. (Staff photo by Ian McNulty, NOLA.com | The Times-Picayune)


The restaurant is hidden between a daiquiri shop and a self-storage unit and gives a speakeasy vibe without even trying. Those who remember when this address was O’Brien’s Grille will be glad to again have a high-caliber steakhouse in these parts.







trini doubles.jpeg

Doubles are classic Trinbagonian street food, with chickpea curry inside tumeric flatbread, served at Queen Trini Lisa, a Mid-City restaurant for flavors from Trinidad and Tobago.




Queen Trini Lisa

4200 D’Hemecourt St., (504) 345-2058

Lisa Nelson finds harmony in connecting the cooking of the Caribbean’s southernmost island, Trinidad and Tobago, and its northernmost port, New Orleans. Her new restaurant on a Mid-City back street showcases this deliciously. Her barbecue jerk chicken pulses with earthy, peppery spice and layers on dark, smoky, light sweet barbecue sauce.







trini jerk.jpeg

The barbecue jerk chicken is a twist on the classics at Queen Trini Lisa, the Mid-City restaurant for flavors from Trinidad and Tobago. (Staff photo by Ian McNulty, Nola.com | The Times-Picayune)


Her rendition of fish and chips is among the finest you’ll find in New Orleans. Try the doubles, a Trinbagonian street food classic, with puffy turmeric flatbread folded around (or doubled over) a curried chickpea chana and a cooling cucumber chutney.







breakaways both

Shrimp and okra gumbo and a daube po-boy with garlicky persillade fries at Breakaway’s R&B, a restaurant and bar working an old school style in new ways in New Orleans. (Staff photo by Ian McNulty, NOLA.com | The Times-Picayune)


Breakaway’s R&B

2529 Dauphine St., (504) 571-5179

This Marigny bar and restaurant opened in January but is immediately familiar as a continuation of the spirit of New Orleans neighborhood joints.







breakaway tofu

Tofu topped with garlicky persillade and mirliton slaw make for a vegan po-boy at Breakaway’s R&B, a restaurant and bar working an old school style in new ways in New Orleans. (Staff photo by Ian McNulty, NOLA.com | The Times-Picayune)


Chef Paul Artigues focuses on old-school New Orleans flavors — the daube po-boy for one, or the remarkable crawfish étouffée (a frequent special). But he also has a modern sensibility for how many people eat today, so there are vegan options (including a gorgeous and not-wimpy-at-all citrus spinach salad) and late-night hours.







breakaways snoball

Sno-ball cocktails are a specialty at Breakaway’s R&B, where the jukebox is stocked with New Orleans classics and the kitchen puts its own spin on local flavor. (Staff photo by Ian McNulty, NOLA.com | The Times-Picayune)


The bar mixes boozy sno-ball cocktails, which sound like just the thing sometimes, doesn’t it?







rabbit bagel

An everything bagel thickly piled with scallion cream cheese at the Rabbit’s Foot, a market and cafe in the Lower Garden District dubbed a modern bodega. (Staff photo by Ian McNulty, NOLA.com | The Times-Picayune)


The Rabbit’s Foot

2042 Prytania St.

Conceived as a “modern bodega,” this café and food market opened in March in the former, long-vacant Lower Garden District address that had been a Zara’s grocery.







rabbit market

The Rabbit’s Foot is a market and cafe with a focus on small local food and drink producers in the Lower Garden District. (Staff photo by Ian McNulty, NOLA.com | The Times-Picayune)


It’s a place for a pastry and an exquisite coffee, a quick sandwich, and a few items for home or maybe a country loaf from an artisan baker.







rabbit sandwich

Chicken salad spills from a sandwich at the Rabbit’s Foot, a market and cafe in the Lower Garden District dubbed a modern bodega. (Staff photo by Ian McNulty, NOLA.com | The Times-Picayune)


The short opening kitchen menu has a breakfast sandwich modeled after the New York bodega staple of breakfast rolls (egg, bacon and cheese on a chewy roll), bagels heavily mounded with cream cheese and a few lunch sandwiches. The chicken salad sandwich is chunky, meaty and sluiced with vinaigrette for a little extra zing.







bao 4.jpeg

Garlic butter shrimp top a rice noodle bowl at Bao Mi in New Orleans. (Staff photo by Ian McNulty, NOLA.com | The Times-Picayune)


Bao Mi

2000 Tulane Ave., (504) 302-7964

Vietnamese flavors get fast-casual treatment and some next-generation twists at this counter-service restaurant embedded in the medical complex along Tulane Avenue, just lakeside of South Claiborne Avenue.







bao 1.jpeg

The KFC boa with fried chicken pieces and aioli in steamed buns at Bao Mi in New Orleans. (Staff photo by Ian McNulty, NOLA.com | The Times-Picayune)


There’s traditional banh mi and others filled with pulled pork or “pew pew shrimp” with a chile-spiked mayo sauce. The “KFC” bao are taco-like bundles of steamed bun filled with crunchy-crisp chicken with the tang of soy sauce and garlic.







bao 3.jpeg

Bao Mi is a new spot for fast casual Vietnamese flavors in New Orleans. (Staff photo by Ian McNulty, NOLA.com | The Times-Picayune)


For a more substantial lunch, get the bun, a rice noodle bowl strewn with vegetables, fish sauce and, for one version, garlic butter shrimp. Note that Bao Mi is open weekdays only.







tava 10.jpeg

Dosa, a thin pancake made from fermented rice and lentil batter on a piping hot griddle, is a centerpiece of Tava Indian Street Food in New Orleans. (Staff photo by Ian McNulty, NOLA.com | The Times-Picayune)


Tava Indian Street Food

611 O’Keefe Ave., (504) 766-9612

Dosa sets the scene at chef Manish Patel’s new downtown restaurant, the evolution of his one-time food hall stand. This lacy, toasty, delicate pancakes are made from fermented rice and lentil batter before your eyes at the bar, and served as platters to rip apart with curry, spicy lamb or chickpea stew.







tava 8.jpeg

Chef Mianish Patel prepares dosa on a piping hot griddle at his restaurant Tava Indian Street Food in New Orleans. (Staff photo by Ian McNulty, NOLA.com | The Times-Picayune)


The rest of the menu takes a playful fusion approach, with Kashmiri chiles revving up the chicken wings and tots crossed with Indian chaat. The Indian-inspired cocktails make the bar worth a visit on its own. See my full report on Tava here.

Dosa starts with a dollop of fermented rice and lentil batter, transformed by a piping-hot griddle into a crêpe-like creation. It’s by turns l…

Through her career cooking in the upper echelon of American fine dining, Jacqueline Blanchard learned that having the right tools is vital and…

Purchases made via links on our site may earn us an affiliate commission

Next Post

Miami Intercontinental Airport Assessments New Technology For Intercontinental Flights

If you’re flying internationally out of Miami-Dade County Airport, you will shortly be ready to keep that passport in your pocket when you’re going by boarding. Miami shortly will be the initially U.S. airport to use biometric boarding at all of its global gates. Instead than displaying your passport to […]

You May Like